News

Lauren and Carmen at Science Atlantic

This past weekend, two Wyeth Lab students presented their work at this year’s (virtual) Science Atlantic Aquaculture & Fisheries and Biology Conference. Carmen Ucciferri presented her poster on the electrophysiology of chemosensation in the pond snail Lymnaea (video presentation here). Lauren Sobot gave a talk (and won first prize in the Biology section!) on DNA cruciforms in Vibrio spp. (RCW is internal honours supervisor for Lauren, who worked with Nik Thomas at Dalhousie.) Great work from both of them!

Job Posting: Wastewater Monitoring Technician

The Biology Department at St. Francis Xavier University (Antigonish, Nova Scotia) is seeking a research technician to conduct weekly monitoring of pathogens in wastewater.  As part of a province-wide project with several Nova Scotian universities, we will be applying a newly developed protocol that effectively and safely detects specific pathogens in wastewater. All work will be conducted in Antigonish, an on-the-job training for the sampling and measurement protocols will be provided.

Review of applications will begin Jan 4, 2021

Publication!

This was a collaboration led by Jim Williams and his students Megan Fraser and Tyler Winsor. And it is the first ever botanical study RCW been part of. With our analysis and stats help, they showed that sediment from Boat Harbour that predates its conversion into an industrial waste treatment lagoon can effectively support the growth of both cord grass and eel grass. These are promising results for the planned restoration of Boat Harbour (or A’se’k to give its Mi’kmaq name) once the industrial sediment layer has been removed.

Megan R. Fraser, Tyler Winsor, Jim Williams, Russell C. Wyeth, and David J. Garbary. Assessing the viability of pre-industrial sediment prior to remediation using primary producer (Zostera marina and Spartina alterniflora) growth and survival. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciencese-First doi: 10.1139/cjfas-2019-0415

data, we got it

We returned to active research in late June. Since then, progress has been truly outstanding. Five students (Rachel Webber, Megan Fraser, Lia Blackett, Laura Brady, Michelle Hodgson), working with 15 local have harvesters have collected 2500+ hours of underwater video of lobster foraging behaviours. Three students (Katherine Purvis [tech, actually!], Lexie Trevors, Allanique Hunter) have collected 4000+ images of biofouling for two studies, one a collaboration with Graphite Innovation & Technologies, and the other a new test of how ultraviolet light can be use for antifouling. Other fantastic work: hundreds of electrophysiological recordings of snail chemosensory responses (Carmen Ucciferri), neuroanatomy of both Lymnaea and Tritonia (Donica Larade), plus plenty of progress on manuscripts (Emmerson Wilson) and analysis and writing for MSc theses (Ella Maltby, Areej Alansari). Not much to say other than handing out massive kudos to the awesome group working in the Wyeth Lab this summer! Also, a special thanks to our Research Group at StFX for helping us get restarted, and our local community for keeping the pandemic situation manageable in our neighborhood.

Publication!

A new first for the Wyeth Lab: a publication as a direct consequence of a conversation at the Canadian Society of Zoologists meeting.  We (Shelby Brown [Wyeth Lab alumn] and RCW) have helped out Laura Eliuk and Jillian Detwiler with some video analysis of snail behaviours.  The primary result: some interesting changes in how attractive one species of snail is to another species of snail, depending on whether the first snail is infected by a parasite that is also a parasite of the second snail!  As you might expect: the parasite seems to make the first host more attractive to the second host. The implication, thus, is host-behaviour modification via a chemical cue!  Looking forward to more productive work in this collaboration!

Eliuk, L.K., Brown, S., Wyeth, R.C., and Detwiler, J.T. 2020. Parasite-modified behaviour in non-trophic transmission: trematode parasitism increases the attraction between snail intermediate hosts. Can. J. Zool.: 417–424. doi:10.1139/cjz-2019-0251.

Zoom + Jamboard talks

Great work from everyone in the lab last week. Methods and more presentations, but not using PowerPoint. Instead, we used Zoom + Google Jamboard (because whiteboard options in Zoom and Teams had limitations). Mock deployments, presenting graphs or activity heat maps, and nervous system structure were all covered. It was a great way to delve deeper into our advance prep for lab and field work (and also thesis defenses). Forcing the use of just a few images and some simple drawing helps foster a bit more of a story-telling approach, and was great at helping to spot gaps in planning.

An Empty Lab Doesn’t Stop the WyethLab!

It’s that time of year again, when we both welcome new faces into the WyethLab and our field research projects really ramp up. Although the pandemic restrictions mean we haven’t yet been able to actually do any lab or field work yet, lots of preparation is still happening as everyone works remotely. This summer, 14 lab members are making great use of MS Teams and working together on several different projects:

And also an extra thank you to Chelsie Hall, project manager working behind the scenes to help keep things on the straight and narrow!

Funding – several times over

A number of events have occurred this past year: a federal election, a horrific plane accident, and a pandemic. A completely understandable side effect of these has been that that many research funding announcements have not been made. THAT means that the typical embargoes on publicizing the funding have effectively been extended indefinitely. However, these successes are important for the research we do, and particularly, for supporting the students who do so much of the work. So, although I cannot directly acknowledge the sources, I would like to announce…

A huge thank you to the great work by past students who have led up to this. Obviously, this does not compare to the larger events in the world, but the funding is going to make a huge difference for how 13 students spend their time this summer, and many others over coming years in the Wyeth Lab and elsewhere in the Biology Dept.

Publication!

Alex Young has published his second article from his MSc.   While working to adapt flourescent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods to work with Lymnaea stagnalis, two things became apparent.  There’s a fair number of published protocols out there, and no one has consolidated all the variants in one location to help anyone in our position.  So, he decided to do it himself – adding in the expertise of Dan Jackson, we’ve put together exactly what the title says it is: a technical review and guide to RNA FISH.  Hopefully others looking to work with FISH for the first time or adapt an established protocol will find this helpful.

Young, A.P., Jackson, D.J., and Wyeth, R.C. 2020. A technical review and guide to RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization. PeerJ 8: e8806. PeerJ Inc. doi:10.7717/peerj.8806.

Congrats Aaron

Congratulations to Wyeth Lab alumn Aaron Cogger, accepted into the Master’s of Marine Management program at Dalhousie University. Aaron worked on a couple different lobster projects. First, with collaborator Jim Williams on juvenile-adult interactions, and then helping Ella Maltby with her MSc research on toxicology of lobsters. Aaron completed his undergraduate in the Aquatic Resources program at StFX and also an Eleuthera internship in the Bahamas before taking this next step in his career.